My Week | Out & About & Mini-Reviews

This time last week we were celebrating the Book God’s birthday, and those celebrations extended into the Monday when we travelled to Brighton so that we could visit the Royal Pavilion. Now we’re back to old clothes and porridge as they say (in a stronger Scottish accent) where I come from. More on Brighton later, but first – the books

I had a really good reading week, finishing three books, starting with Siren Song by Robert Edric, which I’ll review in a day or so.

As for the other two:

Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered by Karen Kilgariff & Georgia Hardstark – so I am fascinated by true crime as I have gone on about here ad nauseam, and one of my favourite sources is the podcast My Favourite Murder hosted by Karen & Georgia, the authors of this book, which is basically a joint memoir expanding on the stories they have told about their lives during the non-murdery parts of their broadcast. I love them and thoroughly enjoyed this book.

The Private Life of Elder Things is “a collection of new Lovecraftian fiction about confronting, discovering and living alongside the creatures of the Mythos.” This is a bit patchy as all anthologies tend to be, but there are some very good stories included. A quick read with one of my favourite things, author’s notes.

This week’s new books:

  • The October Man * Ben Aaronovitch – A Rivers of London novella. Trier is famous for wine, Romans and for being Germany’s oldest city. So when a man is found dead with, his body impossibly covered in a fungal rot, the local authorities know they are out of their depth. Fortunately, this is Germany, where there are procedures for everything. [Pre-order]
  • The Paper Wasp * Lauren Acampora – An electrifying debut novel of two women’s friendship, a haunting obsession and twisted ambition, set against the feverish backdrop of contemporary Hollywood. [Pre-order]
  • 1913: The Defiant Swan Song * Virginia Cowles – It’s the eve of the First World War. One era ends as another is set to begin. Before life is changed forever in the maelstrom of war, the excess and extravagance of European high society blazes its trail. Acclaimed historian Virginia Cowles paints a picture of the glamour and scandals within the upper echelon of society of seven major cities, through rich prose and lively anecdotes.
  • Just One Damned Thing After Another * Jodi Taylor – Chronicles of St Mary’s Book 1 – When Madeleine Maxwell is recruited by the St Mary’s Institute of Historical Research, she discovers the historians there don’t just study the past – they revisit it. But one wrong move and History will fight back – to the death. And she soon discovers it’s not just History she’s fighting…

I’m currently reading The Man from the Train by Bill James which is an early twentieth-century true crime murder mystery. I’m still considering my fiction read.

Back to Brighton. We had a super day walking around the Pavilion before having a delicious meal in a local Italian restaurant, all of this despite the best efforts of two railway companies and rain that was at almost biblical levels. Seriously, it was running down the streets. But we still had fun.

Have a great reading week!

4 thoughts on “My Week | Out & About & Mini-Reviews

  1. It always rains here along the Texas Gulf Coast in Biblical levels. We are always relieved when the rains decide to head away from our homes. The joys of living in a hurricane zone.

    Glad you got to enjoy the Book God’s b-day. It was my esposo’s b-day this week, too, but, sadly, we spent the day painting our home rather than visiting Brighton.

    Books that take you into the Mythos are favorites of mine. Please report back a bit more when you can.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, I’m interested in that Stay Sexy Don’t Get Murdered book, I’ve been seeing it around. I haven’t listened to that podcast but I might need to start! I’m currently reading Killers of the Flower Moon (The Osage Murders and Birth of the FBI) and although the writing is a bit meh, it’s a fascinating true story and I’m learning lots. Ugh, this country of mine. I suppose most countries have horrors in their past (and present) but it’s so disheartening..

    Like

    1. It’s really worth listening to Daphne, as is Red Handed which is British. The book was great fun and I’ve just bought tickets to see the MFM ladies live in London in November, so excited.
      I haven’t read Killers of the Flower Moon, not sure how I feel about it. All countries have horrors in their past, absolutely!

      Like

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